Species

Albino turtle hatchling, Vamizi Island, Mozambique

Rare albino turtles hatch on Vamizi Island

Even after long years of nesting monitoring, there are still things that surprise us all. For the first time on Vamizi Island in Mozambique, on the turtle monitoring project that started over 10 years ago, four albino green turtle hatchlings were found on the island's most successful nesting beach, two of which were still alive. What was even more interesting about these hatchlings, was their red eyes (lack of pigmentation), a common consequence of albinism. …  

28 May 2015 | News story

Artemisia granatensis

Europe’s medicinal plants in decline, 2% threatened with extinction – IUCN report

The IUCN European Red List of Medicinal Plants provides, for the first time, information on the status of all major medicinal plants native to Europe. This assessment includes 400 vascular plants, including trees, aquatic plants and epiphytes, which occupy a wide range of habitats. These plants include common and widely-used species such as Arnica (Arnica montana), St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum), Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and Common Heather (Calluna vulgaris). …  

26 May 2015 | News story

His Royal Highness the Duke of Cambridge and IUCN Director General Inger Andersen

His Royal Highness the Duke of Cambridge leads wildlife talks at IUCN

IUCN was deeply honoured to host His Royal Highness the Duke of Cambridge as he convened a meeting of United for Wildlife (UfW) at IUCN headquarters in Gland, Switzerland, on Monday 18 May to discuss global cooperation in tackling the illegal wildlife trade. United for Wildlife is a collaboration led by the Royal Foundation of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry, in conjunction with seven partner conservation organisations, including IUCN, all joining forces to tackle wildlife crime. …  

22 May 2015 | News story

Fiddler crab

All species great and small must be preserved

The paper, “The Importance and Benefits of Species”, released today in the journal Current Biology, advocates a conservation philosophy that all species are important, no matter their direct use by humans, apparent value, intelligence or attractiveness. The default setting for our relationship to all species on Earth should be “Conservation”, not trying to develop arguments for why a species should be saved through its current perceived usefulness to humans. …  

20 May 2015 | News story

Heron in Los Katíos National Park, World Heritage site, Colombia

IUCN recommends action for natural World Heritage in danger

Key recommendations by IUCN, International Union for Conservation of Nature, on new and threatened natural World Heritage sites are released today ahead of the World Heritage Committee meeting which takes place in Bonn, Germany from 28 June to 8 July. IUCN recommends that Colombia’s Los Katíos be withdrawn from ‘in-danger’ status. It also recommends inscription for a new site in Jamaica and major extensions to two listed sites in Viet Nam and South Africa. A second batch of reports is due at the end of May. …   | French | Spanish

15 May 2015 | News story

Taxonomic focus of vulnerability assessments in the analysed papers

New study provides guidance on assessing species’ vulnerability to climate change

A study by the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC) Climate Change Specialist Group in collaboration with other international experts reviews different approaches for assessing the vulnerability of species to climate change and provides valuable guidance for conservation practitioners. The study found an imbalance in the coverage of different species groups and geographic areas, with the majority of studies focusing on birds, mammals, and plants in North America, Europe, and Australia. …  

30 Apr 2015 | News story

Arabian Oryx

Conservation action makes vital difference to world’s biodiversity, study shows

A new IUCN study evaluating the impact of conservation action on ungulates (hoofed mammals) shows that species have greatly benefited from measures taken to prevent their extinction. If the conservation actions that have already been implemented had not taken place, at least 148 ungulate species would have deteriorated by one IUCN Red List category, including six species that would now be listed as Extinct or Extinct in the Wild. 

30 Apr 2015 | News story

SOS - Save OUr Species, FFI, Abies Firs, 2013A-052

Surveys funded by SOS lead to an increase of the known population of Yuanbaoshan firs

The known population size of the Critically Endangered Yuanbaoshan fir (Abies yuanbaoshanensis) more than doubled following extensive surveys in Yuanbaoshan National Nature Reserve (NNR), China in 2014. IUCN Member, Fauna & Flora International’s Xiaoya Li explains what this discovery means and how it will influence their conservation.   …  

17 Apr 2015 | News story

Landscape

Commercial agriculture and forestry could have a net positive impact on biodiversity – IUCN report

Gland, Switzerland, 16 April 2015 (IUCN) – A new IUCN study examines, for the first time, how commercial agriculture and forestry production could reduce global biodiversity loss by applying innovative approaches already used by some companies in the extractive and infrastructure industries.
 

16 Apr 2015 | News story

Sandbanks in the Wadden Sea Netherlands

Eye on Earth Summit in Abu Dhabi to boost environmental information for decision-makers

Over 650 delegates from government, UN bodies, the non-governmental sector, private sector, academia and civil society will gather in Abu Dhabi between 6 and 8 October for the Eye on Earth Summit 2015, to bridge the information gap policy makers face in designing plans for sustainable development. …  

14 Apr 2015 | News story

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This image shows the courtship behavior of Indian Bull frogs (Holobatrachus tigerinus). During the monsoon, the breeding males become bright yellow in color, while females remain dull. The prominent blue vocal sacs of male produce strong nasal mating call.
Species programme