Local fisheries along Kuraburi river mouth, Thailand  (c) Petchrung Sukpong
Coastal ecosystems rehabilitation and conservation in Sri Lanka and Thailand

This project, funded by German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) and implemented under the auspices of MFF, is facilitating coastal ecosystem rehabilitation and conservation activities in critically degraded ecosystems. The pilot sites selected were coastal stretches of Puttalam Lagoon in northwest Sri Lanka and the Andaman Sea coast from Phang Nga to Ranong Province in western Thailand.

The overall aim of the project is to highlight the linkages between ecosystem health and livelihoods in the selected sites. An integrated coastal management framework has been adopted to guide the process of project implementation on the ground. The project has worked to assess ecosystem services, evaluate threats and identify indirect and direct drivers of change. Management options have been developed in response to the identified threats as part of an ecosystem and sustainable management approach. Based on these findings, coastal ecosystem rehabilitation and conservation measures are being initiated in the pilot sites.

What is this project?

This project forms a component of the Mangroves for the Future Initiative (MFF), a multicountry, multi-sector programme involving tsunami-affected countries of the Indian Ocean. It addresses the second Programme of Work specified under MFF: designing ecologically and socioeconomically sound coastal ecosystem rehabilitation and facilitates coastal ecosystem rehabilitation and conservation activities in critically degraded and threatened ecosystems in tsunami-affected countries of the Indian Ocean. Read more

Why is this project necessary?

The Indian Ocean region encompasses some of the most extensive, and biodiverse, tropical coastal and marine ecosystems in the world, including mangroves and other coastal forests and wetlands, estuaries, lagoons, sandy beaches, sand dunes, coral reefs and seagrass communities. These natural ecosystems provide essential 'infrastructure' for coastal development. In other words, they form a vital part of the stock of assets, facilities and services that are needed for the economy and society to function properly. In order to ensure ecosystem productivity and continued support to human development, ecosystems need to be maintained and improved to meet both today's needs as well as future demands and pressures, just like any other component of infrastructure. Degrading this valuable stock of natural capital puts a serious strain on the economy and society. Read more

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