Investing in nature—the road ahead

26 May 2011 | News story

With growing realization among governments and the private sector that we must invest more in nature, how can the international community help make this happen?

This is the focus of an event being held today at the IUCN Conservation Centre, near Geneva, where members of The Diplomatic Club of Geneva are meeting with environmental leaders to debate the way ahead.

Nature is the life‐support system that allows people, our communities and our economies to survive and thrive on this planet. Yet despite our growing realization of the need to protect nature, we are losing natural assets faster than ever before.

The Diplomatic Club of Geneva which promotes the development of relationships between the international community and the host country is keen to learn more about the work of IUCN and to find out how it can best influence sound environmental action.

Discussions are being opened with presentations from panelists including Ambassador Betty King, Permanent Representative of the USA to the United Nations organizations in Geneva, Ambassador He Yafei, Permanent Representative of China to the UN organizations in Geneva and Ivan Pictet, President of the Fondation pour Genève.

Thanks to the groundbreaking study TEEB—The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity, we now know that we are losing natural capital worth up to US$ 4.5 trillion every year, mainly through deforestation. But while these losses dwarf the costs of the recent economic and financial crisis, there are no rescue packages being proposed for nature. Does nature need a bailout? And is the world ready for it? Where do we need to invest most urgently to rebuild our natural capital?

Many countries are talking about, and implementing, “green growth” strategies. How green are these in reality? Are the objectives of economic growth and industrial development on the one hand, and environmental protection and restoration on the other, mutually compatible? What are the trade‐offs between the two?

Furthermore, what information or knowledge is missing for the world to move forward with increasing investment in natural capital? What should academia and science be researching?

For more information contact:

Giuditta Andreaus, IUCN Strategic Partnerships e. giuditta.andreaus@iucn.org
 


This image shows the courtship behavior of Indian Bull frogs (Holobatrachus tigerinus). During the monsoon, the breeding males become bright yellow in color, while females remain dull. The prominent blue vocal sacs of male produce strong nasal mating call.