Forest Landscape Restoration to meet Ghana’s deforestation challenges

08 February 2006 | News story

In Ghana, the total forest cover has declined from 7.5. million hectares to 6.3 million hectares between 1990 and 2000, and the current rate of deforestation is estimated at three percent per year. Forest Landscape Restoration, which aims at regaining ecological integrity and enhancing human well-being in deforested or degraded forest landscapes, is the World Conservation Union's response to Ghana's challenges.

In Ghana, the total forest cover has declined from 7.5. million hectares to 6.3 million hectares between 1990 and 2000, and the current rate of deforestation is estimated at three percent per year.

The World Conservation Union’s approach to help Ghana meet its challenges is Forest Landscape Restoration (FLR), which is a process that aims to regain ecological integrity and enhance human well-being in deforested or degraded forest landscapes.

In order to validate the analysis of forest landscape change in the country, and to build capacity on forest landscape restoration through various learning activities, a national workshop organized jointly with the Forestry Research Institute of Ghana, the International Tropical Timber Organization and the Union was held last week in Ghana. An action plan was prepared as a practical step towards implementing Forest Landscape Restoration in the field.

The regional minister Nana Kwadwo Seinti of Ghana’s Brongo-Ahafo region pointed out that the workshop was timely and of prime importance to the national economy taken the recent government policies on sustainable forest management including activities aimed towards employment generation, afforestation as well as sustainable livelihood generation and poverty reduction.

The workshop was one in a series of ten national workshops on Forest Landscape Restoration that the Union is organizing jointly with ITTO and Intercooperation.

For more information:

Contact Virpi Stucki at virpi.stucki@iucn.org