Oceania is geographically one of IUCN’s largest regional programmes, covering over 100 million square kilometres of the Pacific Ocean. The region comprises Australia, New Zealand and the 22 Pacific Island countries and territories making up Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia. The total human population is estimated at approximately 35 million, of whom nearly two thirds are resident in Australia.  Learn more

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The Ambassador of the United States of America to Papua New Guinea, His Excellency Walter E. North with participants at the official opening of the National Training Workshop of the Mangroves Carbon Accounting in Port Moresby.

National Training Workshop on Mangroves Carbon Accounting in Papua New Guinea (PNG)

 25 September 2015 | A national  training workshop in mangrove carbon accounting was conducted in Port Moresby from 21st-25th September 2015 by IUCN / USAID Mangrove Rehabilitation for Sustainably-Managed Healthy Forests (MARSH) project, the Office of Climate Change and Development (OCCD) and US Forest Service (USFS). The participants were trained on the Sustainable Wetlands Adaptation and Mitigation Programme (SWAMP) protocol for measuring and monitoring forest carbon in mangroves.  

25 Sep 2015 | News story

Uluna-Sutahuri tribe creates regional partnership to carry out biological surveys within their customary lands

The Uluna-Sutahuri Tribe of Malango, Central Guadalcanal, has signed an historic agreement with the University of the South Pacific, the American Museum of Natural History, and the Solomon Islands Government to plan and implement the Bobosogo Biodiversity Surveys – a collaborative biological inventory of the unique plants and animals living within upland areas of Uluna-Sutahuri Customary Lands of Guadalcanal. …  

08 Sep 2015 | News story

Ariel Brunner of BirdLife Europe

The pros and cons of biodiversity offsets

Protecting forests and restoring wetlands are some of the actions companies and governments are taking to make up for biodiversity lost as a result of their development activities. These measurable conservation actions - designed to compensate for unavoidable impacts, on top of prevention and mitigation measures already implemented - are known as biodiversity offsets. The goal of offsets is to achieve no net loss and preferably a net gain of biodiversity on the ground in relation to species’ numbers, habitat and ecosystem function. …  

07 Sep 2015 | Article

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